priming for change

easy empathy for everyone

 
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 new video coming soon  

 

Empathy coach in your pocket!  

Priming creates positive change with a quick flash of a photo or word.  Empathist app diligently motivates you with primes each time you wake up your device. (1)

 
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How empathist works

Your phone becomes your friendly encourager by priming you with your fav photos & words.   These primes transform your attitudes & behaviors, resulting in a balanced life.  

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Why empathy

Empathy is the ingredient that ties us together.  Balanced empathy makes a peaceful existence possible. 

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Balanced empathy

The delicate balance of connecting emotionally with others & tuning into your own experience.  Investment in & awareness of self & others makes this possible.

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What's priming

A reliable scientific method used in psychological research labs to influence a person's behaviors. empathist uses subtle photo & word cues to prime the path for positive change.

 

"Not only is it the case that happy people are more willing to help others, but as I generally point out, helping others is the best way to help yourself, the best way to promote your own happiness. It is you, yourself, who will receive the benefit."

Dalai Lama - 19 Apr 2018

 
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priming for peace

 
 

Empathist is innovative patent pending technology & the world's first psychological priming app.  Research has shown that priming significantly & reliably changes attitudes & behaviors. (1)  Social & kindness primes help extinguish unconscious prejudices/biases & increases compassion. (2)

Change starts with you.  Help prime a new path to peace by donating today. 

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The science behind the app.

Olson, M.A., Fazio, R.H. (2004). Trait inferences as a function of automatically-activated racial attitudes and motivation to control prejudiced reactions. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 26(1), 1-11.

Batson, C. D., Chang, J., Orr, R., & Rowland, J. (2002). Empathy, attitudes and action: Can feeling for a member of a stigmatized group motivate one to help the group. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 28(12), 1656-1666.

Greenwald, A.G., McGhee, D., Schwartz, J.L.K. (1998). Measuring individual differences in cognition: The implicit association task. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 74, 1469– 1480.

Fazio, R.H., Olson, M.A. (2003). Implicit measures in social cognition research: Their meaning and use. Annual Review of Psychology, 54, 297– 327.

Conner, T., & Barrett, L. F. (2005). Implicit Self-Attitudes Predict Spontaneous Affect in Daily Life. Emotion, 5(4), 476-488.

Batson, C. D. (1991). The altruism question: Toward a social-psychological answer. Hillsdale, NJ, US: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

Ap Dijksterhuis, Ad van Knippenberg, and Rob W. Holland (2014). Evaluating Behavior Priming Research: Three Observations and a Recommendation. Social Cognition: Vol. 32, Understanding Priming Effects in Social Psychology, pp. 196-208.

Bargh, J. A., Chen, M., Burrows, L. (1996). Automaticity of social behavior: Direct effects of trait construct and stereotype activation on action. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 71, 230–244.

Levy, B. (1996). Improving memory in old age through implicit self-stereotyping. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 71, 1092–1107.

Pichon, I., Boccato, G., & Saroglou, V. (2007). Nonconscious influences of religion on prosociality: A priming study. European Journal of Social Psychology, 37(5), 1032-1045.